Jim’s July 2019 Garden Answers

July 2019 Garden Answers

These answers are for the July 2019 Quiz.  You can find all the solutions somewhere – hidden in the pages of The Perfect Vegetable Garden!

 

Answer to Question #1

The question was:  Achocha is also known as: A) A Mexican rodent-like creature, B) A South American game – much like soccer, C) Caigua – A vine growing fruit eaten as a vegetable, D) Bolivian cucumber, E) Both “C)” and “D)”, or F) None of the above.

The correct answer is:

E) Both “C)” and “D)”Achocha seeds from Exotic Plants

The achocha squash – also known as caigua or Bolivian cucumber – originates mainly from 2 Central American countries – Bolivia and Colombia.

This veggie tastes like a mild cucumber – with a hint of mint and bell pepper.

The young fruits can be sliced and added to any dish suitable for cucumbers.

The more mature fruits – having a tougher skin – are perfectly stuffed with meats, fishes, and cheese and baked in an oven.

 

This answer is found in Rare Exotic Plants For The Backyard Garden – Part 4 – Squash.

 

Answer to Question #2

The question was:  Jim, the Lifelong Gardener, loves – loves – loves – Eight Ball!  What is he referring to? A) Jim must like to play pool – and Eight Ball is his main game, B) Maybe he thinks he is “behind the Eight Ball”, C) I think he is talking about some kinda food, D) All the above, or E) None of the Above.

The correct answer is:

C) I think he is talking about some kinda food!

Eight Ball seeds from Burpee

Jim does enjoy a good game of pool – but, his favorite game is Nine Ball – not Eight Ball.  You heard it here – FIRST!

Jim would never admit to being “behind the Eight Ball” – otherwise known as being “disadvantaged.”  He would much prefer to turn any negative into a positive.  In other words, use any failures as a teaching tool to avoid repeating mistakes.

But, hey now – Jim’s a gardener – so, it is common sense to think that the Eight Ball he loves is some kinda fruit or veggie.  And, lo and behold!  It is!  It is a dark green orb-like squash about 4 inches across – a bit sweet, nutty, and buttery – think Italian zucchini.

But, don’t let Eight Ball squash grow much bigger than 4 inches wide – because it will become as hard as a tree stump.  Then, the only recourse is to paint it black – add the number “8” – and throw it on the pool table for a game or two!

 

This answer is found in Rare Exotic Plants For The Backyard Garden – Part 4 – Squash.

 

Answer to Question #3

The question was:  Jarrahdale is a mythical place in the land of Narnia.  Just ask Aslan – Narnia’s famous lion!  This statement is: A) True or B) False.

The correct answer is:

B) False

The city in the Chronicles of Narnia is Cair Paravel – where the kings and queens reside.

Jarrahdale seeds from Burpee

Jarrahdale is a strain of blue squash – commonly used to make the most breathtakingly delicious pumpkin pies.  It originated in Jarrahdale, Western Australia – a tiny little town of less than 2,000 residents – about 45 kilometers southeast of Perth.

The innards of the Jarrahdale pumpkin squash are about the same color as standard American pumpkins – but, the smell is much, much more pleasant and satisfying.  Once you’ve eaten a pumpkin pie made with Jarrahdale, you’ll never want to use regular pumpkins – ever again!

 

This answer is found in Rare Exotic Plants For The Backyard Garden – Part 4 – Squash.

 

Answer to Question #4

The question was:  The North Georgia Candy Roaster is a colorful squash with its origins in: A) The northernmost section of the Rocky Mountain range, B) Ohio, C) Alabama, D) South Carolina, or E) The southeastern section of the Appalachian Mountain range.

The correct answer is:

E) The southeastern section of the Appalachian Mountain range.

North Georgia Candy Roaster squash from Frozen Seed Capsules

This isn’t a trick question.  Because, the southeastern section of the Appalachian Mountain range runs smack dab into the hills of North Georgia – encompassing the northeastern area of the state!  That’s why this squash is called the “North Georgia” Candy Roaster.

The Cherokee Indians get the credit for this smooth and sweet squash – so sweet that it has “candy” in its name.  Believe it or not, it actually gets sweeter and sweeter as time goes on…

Great not only in desserts like pies – it also makes great bread and stews – among others.

 

This answer is found in Rare Exotic Plants For The Backyard Garden – Part 4 – Squash.

 

Answer to Question #5

The question was:  What squash looks like a flying saucer – or a child’s spinning top? A) A Queensland Blue Australian Squash, B) A Blue Hubbard Squash, C) A Pattypan Squash, or D) Zucchini Squash.

The correct answer is:

C) A Pattypan Squash

White Bush Scallop squash seeds from Stonysoil Seed Company

If you see this one in the grocery store, you will instantly recognize it – because of its unusual look.  They taste much like a tender zucchini – just sweeter.  But, pick them when young and small.  If you wait until they are fully mature, pattypans taste more like potatoes.

Southern France calls this squash “pâtisson” – or “cake in a scalloped mold.  Other countries may call it, peter pan squash, granny squash, or sunburst squash.  The folks in Poughkeepsie, NY, call it “schwoughksie” (pronounced, “shwooxie”).

 

This answer is found in Rare Exotic Plants For The Backyard Garden – Part 4 – Squash.

 

Answer to Question #6

The question was:  What type of squash does this trombone remind you of? A) Tromboncino, B) Red Kuri, C) Sweet Potato Squash, or D) None of the above.

The correct answer is:

A) Tromboncino

Tromboncino squash seeds from Hazzard's SeedsTromboncino squash seeds from IDEA HIGH

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This has got to be the easiest “no gimmick” question for this month, don’t you think?  Drop the “e” off of trombone and add “cino” and there you have the squash’s name.

Being a summer squash – for the most part – tromboncino has a higher than normal tolerance against pests and diseases.

Hailing from northwestern Italy, tromboncino grows pretty straight – resembling a trombone shape if grown on trellises.  If left to its own devices – to grow along the ground – this squash will curl up on itself – changing color from pale green in its youth – to a bit of a beige color when it is fully developed.

 

This answer is found in Rare Exotic Plants For The Backyard Garden – Part 4 – Squash.

 

Answer to Question #7

The question was:  What type of grass did Jim, the Lifelong Gardener, use as a cover crop over the winter? A) Triticale, B) Barley, C) Buckwheat, D) Oats, E) Cereal Rye, F) Annual Ryegrass, or G) None of the above.

The correct answer is:

F) Annual Ryegrass

Pennington Annual Ryegrass 25 lb

Jim’s choice was annual ryegrass.  It grows amazingly fast – to quickly thwart weed growth – and, it is the least expensive of all the choices.  And, Jim is always looking for ways to save a buck or two!

Matter of fact, the annual ryegrass just keeps coming back – even after spring tilling and planting.  But, having it peek out between the veggies in the garden is much better than seeing all those nasty weeds – thistles, crabgrass, etc.

 

This answer is found in Jim’s Garden Adventure 2019 Chapter 1 “A Rag Tag Tell-All.”

 

Answer to Question #8

The question was:  What type of nitrogen fixing legume cover crop was incorporated over the winter by Jim? A) Alfalfa, B) Clover, C) Peas, D) Beans, E) Vetch, F) None of the above.

The correct answer is:

C) Peas

Austrian Field Peas

Specifically, Jim used Austrian Field Peas – because they were not only the less expensive – but, also the most proficient at adding nitrogen back to the soil.

Mixing 5 pounds of the peas in with the annual ryegrass, gave enough cover crop seeds to sow the entire 2,400+ square feet of the garden.  And, over the winter, the garden area retained the most vivid green color – standing out midst the brown Bermuda grass in Jim’s backyard.

 

This answer is found in Jim’s Garden Adventure 2019 Chapter 1 “A Rag Tag Tell-All.”

 

Answer to Question #9

The question was:  Putting all his cover crop seeds in a big old burlap sack – with a shoulder sling – Jim spent 2 hours distributing his cover crop seeds throughout the garden.  This statement is: A) True or B) False.

The correct answer is:

B) FalseScotts Broadcast Spreader

Jim is not “Johnny Appleseed.”

And, Jim is always looking for the easiest and quickest way to accomplish any garden task.  Of course, he used his Scotts Broadcast Spreader – and, the work was done in less than half an hour!

Never do things the hard way.  It takes all the fun out of it!

 

This answer is found in Jim’s Garden Adventure 2019 Chapter 1 “A Rag Tag Tell-All.”

 

Answer to Question #10

The question was:  When should cover crops be cut and tilled into the garden soil? A) Before they go to seed, B) After they go to seed, or C) Neither.

The correct answer is:

A) Before they go to seed

Field Peas - Legume Cover Crop

Waiting until AFTER the cover crops flower and go to seed, will allow them to take over your summer garden – crowding out the veggies and competing with them for the soil’s nourishment.

So, I get out my handy, dandy Husqvarna Garden Tractor and chop them down as much as possible – then, work them thoroughly into the soil with either my electric or gas tiller.

Choosing to do cover crops in the winter means that you must be cognizant of the extra steps you will need to take to ensure a healthy growing veggie garden in the spring.

 

This answer is found in Cover Crop Garden For The Backyard Gardener.

 

Answer to BONUS QUESTION

The question was:

I’m baking a cake from scratch and the recipe calls for 4 cups of flour.

If I had a container that would measure one cup (i.e. 8 ounces), life would be good.  But, I only have a 3-cup measuring jug and a 5-cup measuring jug.

What are two (2) different ways for me to accurately measure the 4 cups of flour needed for the cake?

The correct answer is:

A 5-cup measuring jug and a 3-cup measuring jug is all I have.

 

Method 1:
  1. Fill the 3-cup jug with flour and pour the flour into the 5-cup jug.
  2. Fill the 3-cup jug again with flour and fill the 5-cup jug – which will require adding 2 cups. That leaves 1 cup of flour remaining in the 3-cup jug.
  3. Remove all 5 cups of flour from the 5-cup jug and pour the 1 cup of flour remaining in the 3-cup jug into the empty 5-cup jug.
  4. Fill the 3-cup jug with flour and pour the flour into the 5-cup jug. Now, there is a total of 4 cups of flour in the 5-cup jug.
Method 2:
  1. Fill the 5-cup jug with flour and pour flour into the 3-cup jug until it is full. This will leave 2 cups of flour in the 5-cup jug.
  2. Remove all the flour from the 3-cup jug and pour the 2 cups of flour from the 5-cup jug into the 3-cup jug.
  3. Fill the 5-cup jug again with flour and fill the 3-cup jug – which will require adding 1 cup.
  4. After 1 cup of flour is removed from the 5-cup jug, there are 4 cups left in it.

 

Simple is – as simple does.

Nothing like a down-to-earth solution to what seemed to be an insurmountable problem!

 

This brings to a close another month of testing – to see if folks are paying attention to all the informative and detailed information in The Perfect Vegetable Garden.  Always lookin’ for comments or emails from y’all.  Don’t disappoint me!

 

Jim, the Lifelong Gardener

jim@perfect-vegetable-garden.com

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *