Jim’s March 2019 Garden Answers

March 2019 Garden Answers

 

Here are the answers for the March 2019 Quiz.  Click the “answer is found in” links to go directly to the articles and all the nitty gritty details.  I personally suggest just browsing around The Perfect Vegetable Garden for a one of a kind experience!

 

Answer to Question #1

The question was: In shape and color, Cape Gooseberries look mostly like: A) Golden globes of sunshine, B) Road apples, C) Baby cucumbers, or D) None of the above.

The correct answer is:

A) Golden globes of sunshine.

Cape Gooseberries

Now just look at the picture.  Don’t these little orbs just look like luscious drops of golden sunshine?  They don’t even closely resemble baby cucumbers – do they?

And, as for road apples – for those who don’t know what “road apples” are – they are what comes out of the southern end of a northbound horse.  And, that’s all I have to say about that!

This is where road apples come from.

 

This answer is found in Rare Exotic Plants For The Backyard Garden – Part 2 – Berries.

 

Answer to Question #2

The question was: Pineberries were created by: A) Crossing a pine tree with a blueberry, B) Crossing a pineapple with a strawberry, C) Genetic modification, or D) None of the above.

The correct answer is:

D) None of the above.Pineberries

Pineberries were actually created by crossing a variety of strawberries grown in the U.S.A. – in Virginia – with a variety of strawberries grown in South America – in Chile.

 

This answer is found in Rare Exotic Plants For The Backyard Garden – Part 2 – Berries.

 

Answer to Question #3

The question was: The basic structure of soil is composed of 3 elements: A) Salty, sweet, and clammy, B) Sandy, silty, and clay, C) Peaty, chalky, and loamy, or D) Both “A” and “C”.

The correct answer is:

B) Sandy, silty, and clay.

Basic soil elements - sand, silt, and clay.

All soil is made up of varying degrees of sandy, silty, and clay materials.  Even though some consider “peaty, chalky, and loamy” to be extra soil-type materials, they are still made up of a combination of the basic 3 components – sandy, silty, and clay.

I’ve never tasted soil – so, I don’t know if it is sweet or salty.  If it’s damp, it could be a bit clammy, though…

 

This answer is found in Soil Analysis Across The Globe – Getting Down And Dirty.

 

Answer to Question #4

The question was: Besides containing a host of minerals, soil also contains microbes.  Just how many microbes do you think are in a teaspoon of soil? A) Almost none – you would have to gather up at least a gallon of soil to get a valid microbe count, B) Anywhere from a few – to the population of a small Midwestern city, or C) More than the population of Mother Earth.

The correct answer is:

C) More than the population of Mother Earth.

More microbes in a teaspoon than number of people on Earth.

That’s right!  There are easily well over 7 Billion (with a big “B”) microbes in a teaspoon of soil – only one teaspoon full – which is just about the current number of people walking our earth!

The Worldometers website shows an interesting real-time look at just how fast our world population is growing – and, the microbes are proliferating just as quickly!

 

This answer is found in Soil Analysis Across The Globe – Getting Down And Dirty.

 

Answer to Question #5

The question was: Soil around the world is layered.  Each layer is identified by a letter.  The soil surface contains plants and partially decomposed organic matter and is represented by the letter “O” – for organic.  The “O” layer is actually referred to as: A) The “O” blanket, B) The “O” sheet, C) The “O” horizon, D) This is a trick question.  It’s referred to as the “O” layer – DUH, or E) None of the above.

The correct answer is:

C) The “O” horizon

Soil analysis - soil horizons.

When I first learned of this terminology, I never woulda thunk it!  To me, a horizon is a point off in the distance where the sky meets the earth.  But, some soil scientist – a long time ago – deemed it appropriate to use the word, “horizon”, to describe layers of soil.

To continue with this, the “A” horizon is the topsoil layer just beneath the “O” horizon.  Underneath “A” are “B” (The subsoil – which contains small, broken pieces of rock and some organic matter.), “C” (Consisting mostly of large, broken pieces of bedrock.), and “R” (Solid bedrock.).

In some areas, there may be an “E” horizon – sandwiched between “A” and “B” horizons.  Minerals that are washed down from above sometimes get trapped – creating their own unique layer – and that’s where the name, “E” horizon, comes in.  I suppose “E” is supposed to mean “extra” – huh, Mr. Soil Scientist?

 

This answer is found in Soil Analysis Across The Globe – Getting Down And Dirty.

 

Answer to Question #6

The question was: If I were analyzing soil in the New England area, I would be talking about dirt in which of the following groups of states? A) New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania, B) Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont, C) Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, and Wisconsin, D) Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming, E) All of the above, or F) None of the above.

The correct answer is:

B) Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont.

Soil analysis - New England states

The New England area runs along the northeast coast of the United States – along the Atlantic Ocean.

“A)” – The states of New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania are considered Mid-Atlantic states.

“C)” – The states – Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, and Wisconsin – are in the Midwest.

“D)” – Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming are out west – far, far away from the east coast’s New England area.

 

This answer is found in Soil Analysis Across The Globe – Getting Down And Dirty as well as in Soil Analysis – New England – United States.

 

Answer to Question #7

The question was: In the New England area, Windsor, Paxton, Chesuncook, Marlow, Narragansett, Tunbridge are names of: A) Famous soil scientists, B) State soils, C) Indian tribes that inhabited the New England area, or D) Past state governors.

The correct answer is:

B) State soils

Windsor soil - state soil of Connecticut

Each name is specified as the state soil of their respective state.  There are, obviously, other soils present – but, these are the most abundant in each of the states.

Windsor is the state soil of Connecticut – named after the city of Windsor, in Hartford County.

Paxton is the official soil of Massachusetts – from the city of Paxton, in Worcester County.

Chesuncook is the most abundant soil in Maine – Named after a lake in northern Maine of the same name.

Marlow – the state soil of New Hampshire – is named for the city, Marlow, in Cheshire County.

Narragansett soil is the official dirt in Rhode Island – getting its name from both the city and the Indians living there when the earliest settlers came.  Narragansett is the English version of the Indian name, “Nanhigganeuck”, which means “people of the small point.”

Tunbridge soil in Vermont was officially made the state soil – and, it’s main concentrations were centered around the small town of Tunbridge, in Orange County – a wide stretch in the road – with a population of less than 1,200 folks – covering less than 45 square miles.

 

This answer is found in Soil Analysis – New England – United States.

 

Answer to Question #8

The question was: What the heck is arugula? A) A very rare fruit that can only be found in the wilds of the rain forests of South America, B) A method of purging diseased veggies from a home garden, C) The term used in India to describe the long and loud belching that accompanies enjoyment of meals, D) A peppery tasting, leafy veggie, E) Rocket, or F) Both “D” and “E.”

The correct answer is:

F) Both “D” and “E.”

Arugula growing in a garden.

Arugula is an American English word for a tangy, peppery, leafy veggie.  It was introduced only recently – in the last 3 decades – to the U.S.A. – even though it has been popular in the “Old World” – Europe, the Middle East, and Asia – for at least a couple of centuries.

The British call it “rocket.”  Other names include garden rocket or roquette.

This lettuce-like veggie is a great and very flavorful addition to any salad – making rabbit food a lot less boring.

Even though arugula is not a way to get rid of veggie diseases, the plant itself is naturally pest resistant due to its peppery-ness.  Those pesky bugs just don’t like being around it!

 

This answer is found in How To Grow Arugula – This Is “Rocket” Science.

 

Answer to Question #9

The question was: Folks in Mexico and Central America call this edible plant “sandiita” – translated as “little watermelon.”  Hence, this pint-sized food belongs to the squash family. A) True or B) False.

The correct answer is:

A) True

Cucamelon seeds - Zellajake Farm and GardenCucamelon seeds - Garden Seeds Market

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The name this veggie goes by – most of the time – is “cucamelon.”  The cucamelon’s taste is that of a slightly sour cucumber – making it a member of the squash family (Cucurbits) – just like its cucumber, zucchini, and pumpkin brothers and sisters.

This is a very distinctive veggie that is not only a conversation piece but, taste great sliced in a salad or canned as dill pickles.

 

This answer is found in Rare Exotic Plants For The Backyard Garden – Part 3 – Cucumbers.

 

Answer to Question #10

The question was: The lemon cucumber gets its name because, along with a cucumber flavor, its taste has a hint of lemon to it. A) True or B) False.

The correct answer is:

B) False

Lemon cucumber seeds - PlenTreeLemon cucumber seeds - Isla Garden

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

They really don’t taste at all like lemons.  So, don’t expect to use them to make lemon water.  But, they are mildly sweet with no bitter flavor whatsoever – making them a great addition to any salad.

Ya want lemon water?  Slice up some lemons!

 

This answer is found in Rare Exotic Plants For The Backyard Garden – Part 3 – Cucumbers.

 

Answer to BONUS QUESTION

The question was:

Jim, Jack, and Jake all got an equal share of the home brewed beer!

Jim, the Lifelong Gardener, and his 2 brothers, Jack and Jake, were working hard and sweating a lot in Jim’s garden – getting it ready for spring plantin’.  They were all looking forward to finishing the job so they could sit back, drink a little of Jim’s home brewed beer, and admire their work.

When the work was completed, Jim brought out 21 Mason jars – 7 of which were completely filled with his home brewed beer.  Another 7 jars were half filled with beer – and the final 7 jars were empty.

They had no measuring devices available.  So, keeping that in mind, how can the beer and the jars be divided “exactly” equally among the 3 brothers?

The correct answer is:

Jim took 2 of the empty Mason jars and filled both of them – using 4 of the half-filled jars.  Now, there were 9 completely filled Mason jars of home brewed beer, 3 half-filled jars of beer, and 9 empty Mason jars – making the equal sharing of beer and jars an easy task.  Both of Jim’s brothers were happy and pledged to come back next year to get the garden started – looking forward to another enjoyable afternoon with Jim’s home brewed beer!

 

 

The March, 2019, answers are done and delivered.  April’s will be a real mind bender!  I can’t wait to get it published – I’m on pins and needles!

Comments and emails get straight to me.  Don’t hesitate to drop me a line!

 

Jim, the Lifelong Gardener

jim@perfect-vegetable-garden.com

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