Jim’s September 2019 Garden Answers

September 2019 Garden Answers

All the answers for the September 2019 Quiz are here.  Try to find answers in the pages of The Perfect Vegetable Garden!  You might be surprised at how quickly you can do it.  Hint:  These questions have been taken from several of the more recent posts!

 

Answer to Question #1

The question was: Glass gem corn is the most flavorful corn you could ever hope to eat – right off the cob!  1) True or 2) False.

The correct answer is:

2) False

Glass Gem Corn

The corn kernels of glass gem corn have an outer layer with a “glass-like” hardness.  It is grown – not only for its colorful appearance – but, to make the best popcorn or cornmeal.

There is nothing like the taste of corn bread – or grits – made with this veggie.  You can even use the cornmeal as a flavorful coating for deep frying fish, chicken, pork, and fried green tomatoes.  But, before making popcorn or cornmeal with this rare variety of corn, don’t forget to dehydrate the kernels – for the best results.

 

This answer is found in Rare Exotic Plants For The Backyard Garden – Part 5 – Corn, Peas, And Peppers.

 

Answer to Question #2

The question was: Jim, the Lifelong Gardener, is planning to dehydrate some glass gem corn.  His first step would be: 1) Put the corn – while still on the cob – out in the sun to dry it out, 2) Put the corn on the cob in boiling water for about 20 minutes, 3) Put the corn on the cob in boiling water for about 5 minutes, or 4) Glass gem corn cannot be dehydrated.  Good luck with that!

The correct answer is:

3) Put the corn on the cob in boiling water for about 5 minutes.

Excalibur – 9 tray version

This process is called blanching.  Jim doesn’t want to thoroughly cook the corn – just put it in boiling water for about 5 minutes to kill any nasty organisms – then shock it in some cold, icy water – before stripping the kernels off the cob.

Leaving it out in the sun may have worked in days of old, but, it is not a recommended process anymore.

Leaving the corn in boiling water for 20 minutes will cook it completely.  That is overkill.

Then, it is an easy “next step” to dry the kernels and place them in his Excalibur dehydrator.  It takes between 14 and 20 hours to turn them into crispy nuggets – ready for turning into cornmeal in his Ninja food processor or, to be stored as popcorn in Mason jars loaded with oxygen absorbers – and vacuum packed with his Foodsaver vacuum system.

 

This answer is found in Rare Exotic Plants For The Backyard Garden – Part 5 – Corn, Peas, And Peppers.

 

Answer to Question #3

The question was: “Snert” is actually… 1) An acronym that stands for “Snot-Nosed, Egotistical, Rude Teenager”, 2) An acronym that stands for “Sexually Nerdish Egotistically Rude Troll”, 3) A stew, 4) All of the above, or 5) None of the above.

The correct answer is:

4) All of the above

Snert - A Dutch stew.

Wikipedia’s Wiktionary defines “snert” as an acronym for both “Snot-Nosed, Egotistical, Rude Teenager” and “Sexually Nerdish Egotistically Rude Troll” – believe it or not.

But, in the gardening world, it is a Dutch stew made up of pork or beef – along with onions, potatoes, carrots, and purple podded peas.

 

This answer is found in Rare Exotic Plants For The Backyard Garden – Part 5 – Corn, Peas, And Peppers.

 

Answer to Question #4

The question was: “Blauwschokker” is a Dutch word that is used to describe: 1) Peas, 2) A movie thriller, 3) Shock at seeing someone’s blood turn blue, 4) All of the above, or 5) None of the above.

The correct answer is:

1) Peas

Purple Podded Peas

“Blauwschokker” peas – also known as purple podded peas – are famous in Holland.  The Dutch love putting these veggies in a stew they call “Stern.”

These curiously purple pods contain normal looking green peas on the inside.  Monks – in the days of Conan the Barbarian – were responsible for bringing these unique vegetables to the Netherlands and to Germany.

They taste pretty bland by themselves – but, they are very tender – even when raw.  Purple podded peas are usually stripped out of the pods and added to a number of dishes in which peas can be successfully incorporated.

 

This answer is found in Rare Exotic Plants For The Backyard Garden – Part 5 – Corn, Peas, And Peppers.

 

Answer to Question #5

The question was: “Five Color Peppers” amazingly come in the very basic colors of Black, Brown, Grey, Sky Blue, and Pink!  1) True or 2) False.

The correct answer is:

2) False

Chinese Five Color Peppers

Even though “Five Color Peppers” come in – basically – a random array of colors – those colors are, for the most part, purple, cream-colored, yellow, orange, and red.

I’m sure that I would hesitate for a long, long time before eating any peppers that were black – or brown – or grey – or sky blue – or, for God’s sake, pink!  I would expect my “gag reflex” to take over in any such instance!

I will endeavor to stick with colors I am more used to – but, to be able to grow such vivid, electrifying peppers – all on a single plant would be a great boon to my gardening!

 

This answer is found in Rare Exotic Plants For The Backyard Garden – Part 5 – Corn, Peas, And Peppers.

 

Answer to Question #6

The question was: Some of the mildest peppers you can eat are “Five Color Peppers.”  1) True or 2) False.

The correct answer is:

2) False

Harley Store - Chinese five color peppersJaytibby - Chinese five color peppersSolution Seeds Farm - Chinese five color peppers

 

 

 

 

Five Color Peppers are “Chinese” in origin.  So, when would you ever expect the Chinese to use anything mild to spice up their dishes?

These peppers are much hotter and spicier than any cayenne peppers you can grow – and that’s HOT!

But, along with the extreme heat, there is a bit of sweetness – which adds a little twist to the typical hot pepper flavor.

If you like spicy, sweet, and hot – you really gotta try these peppers!

 

This answer is found in Rare Exotic Plants For The Backyard Garden – Part 5 – Corn, Peas, And Peppers.

 

Answer to Question #7

The question was: It’s safe to say that a soil analysis of 4 states in the “east north central Midwest” of the United States would include the states of: 1) Main, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Connecticut, 2) Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, and Ohio, 3) Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina, 4) Washington, Oregon, California, and Alaska, 5) None of the above, or 6) All of the above.

The correct answer is:

2) Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, and Ohio

Midwest – East North Central –United States

Actually, there are 5 states in the east north central Midwest “soil analysis” group when you add in Wisconsin – to the list of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, and Ohio.

The other possible answers?  Please…  The word “Midwest” should be a dead giveaway that these answers are nowhere near being in the relative center – Midwest – of the U.S.A.

Number “1)” – Main, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Connecticut are in the “New England” group of states – along with Massachusetts and Rhode Island.

Number “3)” – Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina are in the “South Atlantic” faction – along with Virginia, West Virginia, Delaware, and Maryland.

And, number “4)” – Washington, Oregon, California, and Alaska are in the “Pacific” collection – along with Hawaii.

 

This answer is found in Soil Analysis – Midwest – East North Central – United States.

 

Answer to Question #8

The question was: Illinois, Indiana, and Wisconsin are in the top 50 highest agricultural producing states in the U.S.A.  1) True or 2) False.

The correct answer is:

1) True

Drummer soil - state soil of IllinoisMiami soil - state soil of IndianaAntigo soil - state soil of Wisconsin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Actually, since there are only 50 states in the entire U.S.A., you can correctly assume that every single state in the U.S.A. is in the “top 50” highest agricultural producing states in the U.S.A.

Calm down – this is just my crude attempt at humor!

But, all kidding aside, Illinois, Indiana, and Wisconsin are actually in the “top 10” highest agricultural producing states in the U.S.A. – which is a pretty great accomplishment!  And, I’m sure that their fertile soils – Drummer – Miami – and Antigo – respectively, have a lot to do with their rankings.

 

This answer is found in Soil Analysis – Midwest – East North Central – United States.

 

Answer to Question #9

The question was: The hardiness zones in the east north central Midwest of the United States are between zones: 1) 1 and 3, 2) 2 and 4, 3) 3 and 5, 4) 4 and 6, 5) 5 and 7, 6) 6 and 8, 7) 7 and 9, 8) 8 and 10, 9) 9 and 11, 10) 10 and 12, 11) 11 and 13, or 12) 12 and 14.

The correct answer is:

4) 4 and 6

The only state in the U.S.A. that falls between hardiness zone 1 and 3 is Alaska.  It gets quite cold up there in the frozen north.  Even the summer months in this chilly state are colder than the winter months in the southern parts of the U.S.A.

The highest hardiness zone possible on the North American continent is zone 11 – which not only covers Florida – but also Puerto Rico!

Since the Midwest is somewhat centralized, that would stimulate the hypothesis that it must lie somewhere in the middle of the North American zones – leaving it squarely between zones 4 and 6.

 

This answer is found in Soil Analysis – Midwest – East North Central – United States.

 

Answer to Question #10

The question was: What special recommendation(s) should be considered for successful veggie growing in the east north central Midwest?  1) Using cover crops in the fall and winter months, 2) Get a soil test every other year as a minimum, 3) Crop rotation, 4) All of the above, or 5) None of the above.

The correct answer is:

4) All of the above.

Annual Ryegrass - Cover Crop

Many areas are known to fall victim to soil erosion – so, using cover crops will hold the soil together until the next growing season.  Besides, cover crops are a great way to add nutrients back into the soil.

A soil test is always a good idea to inform the gardener of the pH and nutrient levels in the soil.  Some home garden enthusiasts religiously get a soil test every year – but, in the east north central Midwest, every other year is quite adequate.

No matter where on Mother Earth that the garden is located – crop rotation is absolutely essential!  Smartly rotating crops can not only keep the bad bugs guessing as to where their favorite plants are – but, it’s also another way to replenish the soil with nutrients – or, at a minimum, prevent nutrient depletion.

 

This answer is found in Soil Analysis – Midwest – East North Central – United States.

 

Answer to BONUS QUESTION

The question was: In the year, 1995, a person is 20 years old.  In 2010, the same person is 5 years old.  How is this possible?

The correct answer is:Born in 2015 B.C. (Before Christ)

The person was born in 2015 B.C.  Thus, in 2010 B.C., they were 5 years old – and in 1995 B.C., they were 20 years old.

 

 

That’s it for this month – in The Perfect Vegetable Garden.  Do you have anything to say about the questions and answers at this point in time?  I’m anxious to hear your thoughts – so, comment or email me – please!

 

Jim, the Lifelong Gardener

jim@perfect-vegetable-garden.com

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